Tuesday 03 August, 2021
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Aboriginal resources

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123 Card Sets from The I Am, Movement
Numbers with Aboriginal designs by Aboriginal artists

“The I Am, Movement” arose from the recent diagnosis of my two-year-old son, Slade, with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). As we attended therapy appointments and doctors’ visits, we were given piles of information and resources but found there to be a lack of culturally appropriate support, resources and connection for Aboriginal families. To address this lack of resources, we offer beautiful Aboriginal-designed flash cards appropriate for use at home, in education settings and in child therapy teams. These flashcards are a tool of healing and connecting to culture on our journey. One set of flashcards teaches numbers 1 – 10 and the other set teaches the alphabet alongside images of native animals. In addition to offering culturally-safe learning resources, “The I Am, Movement” aims de-stigmatise conditions by instead focusing on what you want to be; “I am, unique”, “I am, strong”, “I am, deadly”.

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RRP $39.95

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ABC Card Sets from The I Am Movement
Alphabet with Aboriginal designs by Aboriginal artists

“The I Am, Movement” arose from the recent diagnosis of my two-year-old son, Slade, with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). As we attended therapy appointments and doctors’ visits, we were given piles of information and resources but found there to be a lack of culturally appropriate support, resources and connection for Aboriginal families. To address this lack of resources, we offer beautiful Aboriginal-designed flash cards appropriate for use at home, in education settings and in child therapy teams. These flashcards are a tool of healing and connecting to culture on our journey. One set of flashcards teaches numbers 1 – 10 and the other set teaches the alphabet alongside images of native animals. In addition to offering culturally-safe learning resources, “The I Am, Movement” aims de-stigmatise conditions by instead focusing on what you want to be; “I am, unique”, “I am, strong”, “I am, deadly”.

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RRP $49.95

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Dharawal Colouring and Counting

Numbers 1 to 10 illustrated with animals who live in the Dharawal area. The book gives the Dharawal name for the animal and has a little information. The pages can be coloured in, if desired.

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RRP $12.00

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Emotions Card Sets from The I Am, Movement
Emotions with Aboriginal designs by Aboriginal artists

“The I Am, Movement” arose from the recent diagnosis of my two-year-old son, Slade, with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). As we attended therapy appointments and doctors’ visits, we were given piles of information and resources but found there to be a lack of culturally appropriate support, resources and connection for Aboriginal families. To address this lack of resources, we offer beautiful Aboriginal-designed flash cards appropriate for use at home, in education settings and in child therapy teams. These flashcards are a tool of healing and connecting to culture on our journey. One set of flashcards teaches numbers 1 – 10 and the other set teaches the alphabet alongside images of native animals. In addition to offering culturally-safe learning resources, “The I Am, Movement” aims de-stigmatise conditions by instead focusing on what you want to be; “I am, unique”, “I am, strong”, “I am, deadly”.

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RRP $20.95

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Please knock before you enter
Aboriginal regulation of Outsiders and the implications for researchers

Author(s): Karen Martin (click on the author's name for more titles)

In this dual award-winning book Dr Karen L Martin examines the genealogy of Aboriginal research in Australia as a colonising discourse. She explores the impacts for Aboriginal people and the influences on researcher decisions and behaviours. Then, in taking on the challenges to decolonise research, Karen started not with methodology, but with decolonising research paradigms from which they are derived. Key reasons why it has been used in research programs in higher education.

This work is the first of its kind in Australia to articulate an Aboriginal research paradigm with an Indigenist research methodology. The biggest contributions being the concept of ‘Relatedness’ and the theoretical framework she named, ‘Ways of Knowing, Ways of Being and Ways of Doing’. This Aboriginal research paradigm and Indigenous methodology was consolidated as part a research project with the Burungu, Kuku Yalanji (Far North Queensland) to understand how they regulated Outsiders over time, including those like herself (another Aboriginal person, who in this case is also a researcher). However, it is incumbent on the researcher to have the requisite level of knowledge, experience and understandings of that role and research as a colonising discourse to then, ‘knock before you enter’.

Professor Norman Denzin described Karen’s work as: “a brilliant and stunning dissertation, original in conception and bold in execution...Relatedness theory is a major contribution to this literature.” Other major contributions this book makes to challenging and changing dominant Aboriginal research discourses include: Decolonising research: starting with the paradigm and continuing to the research topic and researcher roles and responsibilities Re-framing research ethics so that it is the participants who benefit and not the researcher

For Aboriginal researchers and participants, reframing research so that it becomes re-search – the search again, the reclamation of our Stories and stories (i.e. ‘getting our Stories back’ Implications for western research and researchers – research is not neutral, researchers are not neutral, writing research is not neutral.

If you are starting your journey as a researcher or have found you’ve hit some glass walls and don’t know how to move to beyond them, this book will be invaluable for changing how you think about research and yourself as a researcher. It will challenge current beliefs about Aboriginal people and Country and research beneficence. For Aboriginal researchers, it will transform research to re-search (the search again).

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RRP $55.00

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Talking to My Country
Stan Grant

In July 2015, as the debate over Adam Goodes being booed at AFL games raged and got ever more heated and ugly, Stan Grant wrote a short but powerful piece for The Guardian that went viral, not only in Australia but right around the world, shared over 100,000 times on social media. His was a personal, passionate and powerful response to racism in Australia and the sorrow, shame, anger and hardship of being an indigenous man. 'We are the detritus of the brutality of the Australian frontier', he wrote, 'We remained a reminder of what was lost, what was taken, what was destroyed to scaffold the building of this nation's prosperity.' Stan Grant was lucky enough to find an escape route, making his way through education to become one of our leading journalists. He also spent many years outside Australia, working in Asia, the Middle East, Europe and Africa, a time that liberated him and gave him a unique perspective on Australia. This is his very personal meditation on what it means to be Australian, what it means to be indigenous, and what racism really means in this country. Talking to My Country is that rare and special book that talks to every Australian about their country what it is, and what it could be. It is not just about race, or about indigenous people but all of us, our shared identity. Direct, honest and forthright, Stan is talking to us all. He might not have all the answers but he wants us to keep on asking the question: how can we be better? Winner of the 2016 Walkley Book Award and the 2016 National Trust Heritage Award, and shortlisted for the 2016 NIB Waverley Library Award and the 2016 Queensland Literary Award. About the Author Stan Grant is a Wiradjuri man. A journalist since 1987, he has worked for the ABC, SBS, and the Seven Network and, since 2013, as the International Editor for SKY News. From 2001 to 2012 he worked for CNN as an anchor in Hong Kong, before relocating to Beijing as correspondent. As a journalist, he has received a string of prestigious international and Australian awards. In 2015, he published his bestselling book Talking to My Country, and also won a Walkley award for his coverage of indigenous affairs. In 2016 he was appointed to the Referendum Council on Indigenous recognition.

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RRP $25.00

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Voices & Visions
Aboriginal Early Childhood Education in Australia

Author(s): Karen Martin (click on the author's name for more titles)

Just as our visions will be the present of some young Aboriginal children who are not yet born, these will be made real through our voices and actions right now. The question begs to be asked: ‘What kind of people do we want those children of the future to remember us as being?’

This book reflects the stories of practitioners in Aboriginal early childhood education in Australia. It is not just their stories, but a text for how Aboriginal worldviews and frameworks are incorporated in what they do. As Aboriginal people we have always had to conform to a Western schooling system, one which does not fully appreciate our knowledges. In what you are about to read there is an implied but silent script in that, ‘you listen now and let us tell you’.

From the Foreword by Jackie Huggins, Inaugural Co-Chair: Aboriginal Congress

I really liked all of the stories and all the voices and how the narra-tives wove around key learnings, highlighting the important events from the author’s points of view, how these were experienced and other things that the writer wants the reader to know: the successes, the challenges; stories of family, of country and so much more. But they are also all essentially stories about early childhood education and what it means to be a good Aboriginal educator … I have never met any of the authors personally but feel I know them after reading the stories.

Professor Maggie Walter, Pro Vice-Chancellor Aboriginal Research and Leadership, University of Tasmania

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RRP $59.95

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What Happened to My World?
Helping Children Cope with Natural Disaster and Catastrophe

FREE PDF DOWNLOAD CLICK HERE

Author(s): Anne Stonehouse, Jim Greenman (click on the author's name for more titles)

This is a resource for parents, teachers, and anyone working with children. It was written to help adults peer into the minds of children from infancy through the teenage years, and understand their confusion, fears, grief, and struggles to understand why inexplicable accidents or the forces of nature can suddenly disrupt or destroy the world as they know it. It is of help both to those who experience and survive catastrophe firsthand, as well as the children who witness from a distance and wonder what it was like or whether someday they will find themselves in similar situations.

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RRP $0.00

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YALAYNHA YULUWIRRI 'FOLLOWING THE RAINBOW' - CD
CD by Nyimirr (Fleur Magick Dennis) and Millmullian (Laurance Magick Dennis)

This is a collection of 16 children’s songs in Aboriginal languages. The songs are sung in Wiradjuri, Gamilaraay and Wayilwan languages. The songs are sung by Nyimirr (Fleur Magick Dennis) and Millmullian (Laurance Magick Dennis). There are some favourites such as Twinkle Little Star translated into Aboriginal language, along with many original children’s songs to delight young and old.

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RRP $33.00

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9 Item(s)

per page

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ALL

Set Descending Direction